FHA lowers mortgage insurance premium for most home buyers – maybe?

In an effort to attract more home buyers to the FHA financing option, on January 9th, FHA announced a reduction in the monthly mortgage insurance premium that most home buyers will pay by 25 basis points for new mortgages closing on or after January 27, 2017.**

FHA says that they have finally reached a stable point in their finances after the enormous losses they endured during the housing collapse. The last four years of housing growth and stability has allowed the FHA to recoup their losses and they want to pass some of these savings on to home buyers to make housing more affordable.

To put this into perspective, for a mortgage of $368,000 (the maximum allowable mortgage for the Portland metro area at this time), this would equate to a monthly savings on your payment of approximately $76.00 (an annual savings of $912).

However, it’s important to remember that mortgage rates have risen over the last several months. We are no longer seeing the low rates we had grown accustomed to over the last 4-5 years at below 4%. Average 30 year fixed rate loans as of today are around 4.25%, even for those with the best credit. So this .25% rate reduction for FHA mortgages only partly offsets the rate increases. Still, every little bit helps, and FHA is the best financing option for prospective home buyers with less than 5% down payment.

In contrast, a conventional home loan will cost the home buyer more to purchase. While there are conventional loans requiring as little as 3% down payment, these are available to only those with the best credit scores; AND the mortgage rate rises for buyers with less than 20% down. FHA rates are the same for those with low down payments  and less than perfect credit, though there is a minimum credit score requirement of at least 620-640 at this time.

**NOTE: I apologize for this footnote, but just as I hit publish on this article, the following news came across: As of yesterday, National Mortgage News reported that Trump is recommending that this reduction in mortgage insurance premiums be delayed until it can be further reviewed by his new Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson. This is purportedly just one of the Executive orders that he intends to sign as soon as he is inaugurated.

Please like & share: