How to win the battle of bugs and weeds around your home and garden with all natural products

It’s the battle of people versus the bugs and weeds as both try to take over our homes and gardens. Take heart, for the most part we can co-exist with most bugs without damaging the environment or killing off the good bugs. Personally I have no love for the weeds, so weeds be gone is my motto as long as I can do it without chemicals and too much work on hot summer days. 

Bugs
Did you know that most bugs have a sense of smell and there are some common household items that bugs do not like the smell of?
1. Vinegar – very few bugs will tolerate and spend time around an area sprayed with vinegar, so feel free to use it liberally to deter pests. This is especially helpful to drive ants out of your house. Personally I wipe down kitchen counters almost daily with vinegar. It works.
2. Essential oils such as peppermint, lavender, tea tree, citrus or neem oils have spiders literally taking their spider webwebs elsewhere. They smell through their feet, so you don’t have to actually spray the spiders, just their webs, and they won’t even walk on them. You can make up a spray bottle with any of a combination of several of these oils, add a few drop of dish detergent, find your target and spray. Keep this on hand because the effects are not forever, so you will have to repeat as needed to keep walkways etc free of spider webs. This works equally well indoors and outside too. By the way, to keep spiders outside, trim plants about a foot away from your foundation.


3. Coffee grounds are great to keep slugs out of your garden beds. If you’re a coffee drinker you probably have plenty around to surround your veggies or favorite young plants with the used coffee grounds. Slugs don’t like that coffee grounds stick to their bellies so they move on. If you don’t drink coffee, try going to the nearest Starbucks or other cafes. They are usually thrilled to have you take coffee grounds away for them, and the plus is that coffee grounds actually nourish the soil. This is so much better than dumping slimy trays of dead slugs that have gone after your good beer in a bowl. Yes slugs love beer, but it’s a nasty mess to clean up.

Weeds
weeds

Is this how big weeds look in your garden?

Weeds are a never ending battle but one that is easily won if you keep on top of it. While some people swear by Round up,  it’s highly toxic and pollutes the ground, gets into ground water, and really does not kill weeds any better than a simple mix of:
1 gallon regular 5% household vinegar
1 cup table salt
1 teaspoon dish detergent
Mix the above in a sprayer and wait for a sunny day to tackle the weeds. It’s best if you can catch the weeds before they flower and set seeds, but if not, just go at it, and repeat as necessary. You should see most weeds die off within hours and certainly within a few days. 
IMPORTANT note here though is that this mix is so effective that you need to be careful to not spray on any plants you care about directly. It will kill your plants as quickly as the weeds you were after. 
If you have weeds growing around the roots of favorite plants, sorry but your best best is to just dig them up.

If weeds have already set seed they’re ready to sprout up somewhere else, so keep vigilant and keep your garden not only looking better but healthier too. Remember those weeds compete with your plants for nutrients in the soil. 

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2017 Oregon Legislative session ends saving important benefits for home owner

The 2017 Oregon legislation session ended last week. Here’s a recap of some of the laws that affect home owners.

HB 2004 – Tenants Rights – failed

Just this week, the long disputed tenants rights bill failed to pass in the Oregon legislature. This is very sad news for tenants, but a huge relief for landlords. It was a poorly written bill that would have enhanced protection for tenants, but was unfairly anti landlords. Tenants will certainly be working to protect their rights again next year, and hopefully a better bill will be written and passed.

In the meantime, renters will retain the rights they already have, which differ from city to city. Before moving, renters should check with the tenants rights groups for the city they are considering moving to so they understand what laws apply to them already, and which laws do not. 

HB 2006 – Mortgage Interest Deduction – failed

This bill would have eliminated the MID (mortgage interest deduction) for individuals making $100,000 or more ($200,000 for joint filers). HB 2006 would have also capped the amount of interest that could be deducted for those individuals making under $100,000 ($200,000 for joint filers) at $15,000 on their primary residence. In addition, the bill would have eliminated the MID for second homes. This bill didn’t get the attention from the public that it probably should have, but the OAR (Oregon Association of Realtors) fought it on home owners behalf. 

With ever increasing housing prices and mortgages, this bill would have hurt just about every home buyer who paid anything close to current average prices for property, especially in the early years of a mortgage when just about all of the principal and interest portion of the payment goes to interest. The interest rate deduction helps middle class families and should not be eliminated. 

HB 2771 – Eliminating the Deductibility of Property Taxes – failed

House Bill 2771 would have phased out the itemized deduction for real property taxes for incomes between $50,000 and $125,000 for single taxpayers and between $100,000 and $250,000 for joint taxpayers. In addition, the bill would have eliminated the ability to deduct property taxes for single tax payers making $125,000 or joint tax payers making $250,000 or more in a year.

Again OAR fought this bill on behalf of all home owners. Home owners should not be the only ones who contribute to state budget shortfalls. And tenants should be equally concerned about these laws since bills eliminating tax write offs for landlords would only serve to increase rents to help those property owners shoulder the additional costs.

 

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Average Portland home prices soar to $423,700 while mortgage rates dip slightly

houses make you moneyNationwide, housing inventories have reached crisis proportions. There is a severe lack of available homes for sale everywhere. Home values are increasing an average of 5+% throughout the country. But here in the Pacific NW, home prices are surging faster than anywhere else in the country. Average prices in Seattle are up about 12% per year, while Portland in the #2 position is seeing average value increases of 10.7%.

Remember, these are average price and value increases. There are some neighborhoods with lower inflation rates, but there are also many with much higher rates. Currently zip code 97233 (Centennial, Rockwood and Mill Park) is leading the metro area seeing prices and values up 19.7% for 2016 and early 2017! This means that if you are currently a home owner in 97233, you’ve watched your home value increase about $2500 – $5000 every month for the last year and a half – depending on size and condition of your home and immediate neighborhood. Still closer in areas such as Tualatin, Tigard, West Hills, Hawthorne, Rose City, Alberta and more are also seeing inflation between 10-15% annually so you’re not being left behind. 

Spring and early summer months are the busiest months of the year for home purchases. 

Buyers are out in droves, so homes are selling as quickly as they hit the market; often with multiple offers and often selling for considerably more than list price.

According to RMLS, new listings for May hit their highest level in May 2017 since May 2008 but demand was so strong that inventory levels actually dropped .2 months (down from 1.7 months to 1.5 months once again.)

What does this mean for buyers?

If you are a prospective home buyer, once you make up your mind that you’re ready to get out and start looking at homes, there are a few things that you should get in order before you proceed. First and foremost, whether you’re paying cash or financing the purchase, get your finances in order.

  1. If you are going to be financing the purchase, get your pre-approval. This means you will need to get your paperwork together for that lender. 
  2. If you’re a cash buyer, be sure your funds are free to use (if you need to sell stocks or move funds from a retirement account, that shouldn’t be left until the last minute.
  3. If you need to sell a home, get it on the market. I know this could put you in a difficult position of needing to move in with friends or stay in a hotel if your house sells too quickly, but sellers need to know that you’re serious and you will need to present proof of your ability to go through with the purchase if your offer is accepted.

Many sellers won’t even allow you to view a home or consider an offer from you without the above business details being in order.

This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t go out and take a look at a few homes just to see what’s available in your price range. But, it really doesn’t make a lot of sense to just go out looking at lots of homes until you’re a serious buyer because prices and values are moving so quickly. The home you’re viewing today at $300,000 will cost and be worth considerably more in 6 months. Still some looking around in advance will help you understand better what your dollars will buy in different neighborhoods, and that’s a good thing to know as you begin this process. 

Strike while the iron’s hot

Boom markets never last forever. The markets ebb and wane all the time. But the old adage to “strike while the iron’s hot” has never made more sense.

strike while the iron's hotMost buyers are not looking for their forever house. They just want a home of their own and the stability of knowing that their monthly payments are locked in (other than tax and insurance increases). Of course obvious. Your purchase starts making you money in the form of equity often before the transaction even closes, and of course the tax advantages can’t be overlooked either. Mortgage interest, property taxes and even mortgage insurance are all tax deductible, so your monthly income rises once you become a property owner.  

 

You might like to read 15 fastest selling neighborhoods in Portland as of June 13, 2017

 

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Pacific NW cities dominate fastest rising home prices in the US

Portland skyline with Mt Hood

Seattle skyline

Portland skyline with Mt Hood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 20 largest cities comprise the list of metro areas that most economists watch as they compile statistics about how most of the economy is functioning. Of course, the same 20 cities are those that are most watched for housing market statistics and trends. In the Pacific Northwest, the most watched cities are Seattle and Portland. AND, Seattle and Portland are #1 and #2 cities in the country with the greatest price and valuation increases for 2016 and into 2017. 

For several years since the housing recovery began Portland topped the list of 20 with the fastest rising housing prices in the country, but we’ve dropped to the #2 position as Seattle has surged ahead of us. Currently Seattle is seeing average 12% annual home price increases, while here in Portland we’re close behind at 10.7%.

Average home prices in Seattle reached $700,000 last month while Portland home average prices increased to $425,000

Like Seattle, in Portland new home construction homes are the priciest; renovated old turn of the century homes are almost as costly, while mid century homes are where the “bargains” can be found.

Developers are snapping up run down mid century homes where they can split the lot and build 3 skinny houses at a huge profit. But developers also love the high end neighborhoods and have no qualms about tearing down those beautiful old estates to cash in on the higher prices of new construction homes.

 

 

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