2017 Oregon Legislative session ends saving important benefits for home owner

The 2017 Oregon legislation session ended last week. Here’s a recap of some of the laws that affect home owners.

HB 2004 – Tenants Rights – failed

Just this week, the long disputed tenants rights bill failed to pass in the Oregon legislature. This is very sad news for tenants, but a huge relief for landlords. It was a poorly written bill that would have enhanced protection for tenants, but was unfairly anti landlords. Tenants will certainly be working to protect their rights again next year, and hopefully a better bill will be written and passed.

In the meantime, renters will retain the rights they already have, which differ from city to city. Before moving, renters should check with the tenants rights groups for the city they are considering moving to so they understand what laws apply to them already, and which laws do not. 

HB 2006 – Mortgage Interest Deduction – failed

This bill would have eliminated the MID (mortgage interest deduction) for individuals making $100,000 or more ($200,000 for joint filers). HB 2006 would have also capped the amount of interest that could be deducted for those individuals making under $100,000 ($200,000 for joint filers) at $15,000 on their primary residence. In addition, the bill would have eliminated the MID for second homes. This bill didn’t get the attention from the public that it probably should have, but the OAR (Oregon Association of Realtors) fought it on home owners behalf. 

With ever increasing housing prices and mortgages, this bill would have hurt just about every home buyer who paid anything close to current average prices for property, especially in the early years of a mortgage when just about all of the principal and interest portion of the payment goes to interest. The interest rate deduction helps middle class families and should not be eliminated. 

HB 2771 – Eliminating the Deductibility of Property Taxes – failed

House Bill 2771 would have phased out the itemized deduction for real property taxes for incomes between $50,000 and $125,000 for single taxpayers and between $100,000 and $250,000 for joint taxpayers. In addition, the bill would have eliminated the ability to deduct property taxes for single tax payers making $125,000 or joint tax payers making $250,000 or more in a year.

Again OAR fought this bill on behalf of all home owners. Home owners should not be the only ones who contribute to state budget shortfalls. And tenants should be equally concerned about these laws since bills eliminating tax write offs for landlords would only serve to increase rents to help those property owners shoulder the additional costs.

 

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